Denied EI Benefits – What Are My Options?

A picture of person stressed to denote a person who was denied EI benefits and doesn't know what to do next.

If you ever been denied EI benefits, it is a horrible feeling. You feel crushed and hopeless as you think that there are now no other options. Now the reality is that Employment Insurance has criteria that one needs to meet to qualify for EI such as having enough insurable hours of employment and so on.

However, things can get a bit murky when it comes to the issue of quitting your job or being fired from it. These issues are adjudicated based on the EI Act and EI digest and then a decision is made to allow your reason of separation or not. It’s in these areas where many people get frustrated as they might feel that they have a valid reason for leaving their job. However, they are denied EI benefits. Is there any other options if you are denied?

Denied EI Benefits – You Can Appeal the Decision

If you are denied EI benefits, you can write a letter back to appeal the decision. You have 30 days after the date of your EI notice of decision letter to do so. In the letter you need to clearly explain why the decision was wrong and provide as much details as possible on why you should have received EI. Sometimes this is where many people get denied in the first place, as they do not fully explain the circumstances that led to them to be fired or them to quit. In the appeal letter, you need to give all these details.

When you send your letter back, it goes to the appeals department where benefit officers will look at your EI claim again and see if there were things missed when the original decision was made. If they look at it and deem that you should have received EI benefits, the decision will be reversed and they will set up your EI claim and inform you of the decision. However, what happens if they uphold original decision to deny you EI?

Board of Referees Hearing

If the appeals department upholds original decision, then your appeal will go to the Board of Referees for a hearing. A date for the hearing will be set and your EI claim will be adjudicated by a three person panel. You can show up for the hearing and present your information to them if you like. A representative from EI Benefits can also come and present evidence also but most of the time, this doesn’t happen as the Board of Referees will have the EI file that the officer made with the details on why they made their decision. They will take this information and any additional information you present and come to a decision to either allow your EI claim or not. What happens if my EI is still denied, are there any other options?

Denied EI Benefits – Appeal to An Umpire

You can appeal the Board of Referees’ decision and it will go to a person called an Umpire. This person will look at all the EI information that is collected at that point and will make a decision base on the EI Act and EI digest above and on previous legal precedents. If the Umpire feels that the person does qualify for EI benefits then the claim is set up. One point of note is that Employment Insurance can also appeal a Board of Referees decision to the Umpire if they feel that the person should not be collecting EI benefits. So what happens if the Umpire still denies my EI claim. Is there any other options?

Last Options – Federal Court and Supreme Court

If you still feel that you should get EI benefits at this point, you can take the case to Federal Court. However, this might take some time (perhaps years) for your case to be heard. At this point, if the Federal Court rules against you, the last option is taking the case to the Supreme Court which will take even more time and there is no guarantees they would even hear your case. At this point, all options would have been exhausted.

Conclusion

There are options to appeal an EI decision that denies you of collecting EI benefits. However, the longer you go in the process, they longer it takes and the road is more and more difficult. So in the end, it comes down to how far you want to take things and do you really feel that the decision made to deny you EI benefits was an injustice that must be rectified no matter what? That’s a decision that only you can make.

GST Dates – When Will I Receive My GST Rebate?

Canadian money to highlight GST dates and when will I receive my GST rebate.

When are the GST dates to receive the rebate cheque? For many this is an important question as this helps cover some extras that they need especially during these times. How do I get a GST rebate and when does it come?

GST Dates – How Do I receive a GST Rebate?

The Government of Canada’s Website, that the amount you receive is base on the following below:

  • your family net income
    • If you’re single, the amount from line 23600 of your income tax return, or the amount that it would be if you completed one
    • If you have a spouse or common-law partner, your net incomes are combined to get your family net income
  • the number of children under 19 years old that you have registered for the Canada child benefit and the GST/HST credit

The key is that you have to file a tax return to be eligible to receive the rebate. Once you file a tax return, CRA calculates if you are eligible for a GST rebate or not.

When Will I Receive a GST Rebate and How Much?

The Government of Canada’s website states that base on your 2020 tax return, GST payments for the 2021 year will be made on July 5, 2021, October 5, 2021, January 5, 2022 and April 5, 2022. The key here is that you have to had filed your 2020 tax return to be eligible.

Regarding payments, the government’s website states that the amount that someone can get in rebate payments base on the 2020 tax year are as follows:

  • $456 if you are single
  • $598 if you are married or have a common-law partner
  • $157 for each child under the age of 19

Conclusion

If you have filed your 2020 return and if you qualify, you should be receiving a GST cheque anytime. If you have not file your 2020 return, then this would be delayed. Not everyone receives a GST cheque as the key component is income and the more income you have, the less chance you will get a payment. However, there are other factors such as marital status and children under 19 years old. The key is to file your return and let CRA calculate it. This rebate might not seem much but for many, it is a pleasant surprise to receive and in these times, every little bit helps.

Can I Get EI if I Quit My Job?

A picture to denote a person wanting to quit their job and asking the question can I get EI if I quit my job?

Can I get EI if I quit my job? This is a very important question and something that a lot of people do not understand. Many people think that they have a better chance to collect Employment Insurance if they quit their job instead of being fired. This is false. Why is this so and can I collect EI if I quit?

Can I Get EI if I Quit My Job? Possible in A Few Cases but Difficult

The EI Digest defines voluntary leave or quit as ” the claimant and not the employer took the initiative in terminating the employer-employee relationship.” it goes on to say that “a claimant is disqualified from receiving any benefits if the claimant lost any employment because of their misconduct or voluntarily left any employment without just cause.”

And that is the key. A person who quits their job must have just cause or you can say a valid reason for doing so. As a result, the onus is on the claimant to prove that they had just cause in quitting their job. This is quite different from someone being fired where the employer has to prove misconduct.

What is Just Cause?

Section 29(c) of the EI Act defines it as below:

Just cause for voluntarily leaving an employment or taking leave from an employment exists if the claimant had no reasonable alternative to leaving or taking leave, having regard to all the circumstances, including any of the following:

  1. sexual or other harassment;
  2. obligation to accompany a spouse, common-law partner or dependent child to another residence;
  3. discrimination on a prohibited ground of discrimination within the meaning of the Canadian Human Rights Act;
  4. working conditions that constitute a danger to health or safety;
  5. obligation to care for a child or a member of the immediate family;
  6. reasonable assurance of another employment in the immediate future;
  7. significant modification of terms and conditions respecting wages or salary;
  8. excessive overtime work or refusal to pay for overtime work;
  9. significant changes in work duties;
  10. antagonism with a supervisor if the claimant is not primarily responsible for the antagonism;
  11. practices of an employer that are contrary to law;
  12. discrimination with regard to employment because of membership in an association, organization or union of workers;
  13. undue pressure by an employer on the claimant to leave their employment, and;
  14. any other reasonable circumstances that are prescribed.

The other reasonable circumstances referred to in EIA 29(c)(xiv) are those which are prescribed by regulation Footnote1

What does the above mean? In layman’s terms, it means that you had to quit your job as you had no other choice based on the reasons mentioned in the EI Act. Also, it is not enough to say that you had a reason to quit, but you have to prove it and show that you tried to remedy the situation or look for an alternative etc. If a Benefits Officer looks at your application and sees that you had just cause, then you can be approve for EI.

Conclusion

It is possible to collect EI if you quit your job. However, you must prove that you had “just cause” in leaving your job. As seen above, this is not a casual reason but a last resort. Because of that, you must think long and hard if you are thinking on quitting your job. Especially, if you are wanting to collect EI while you are not working. Before making at decision, look at your situation and do your research as knowledge is power.

You Might Also Like: Can I Apply For EI if I Get Fired?

Applying For EI Benefits, 5 Things You Should Know

Stressed out person applying for EI Benefits

Applying for EI benefits is often a stressful experience.  The process is not user friendly.  First, you have to go to the government website and look for the EI application.  Once you have found it, you then have the arduous process of going through it, which can take hours.  Also, calling the 1-800 number for help may take even more hours! (This is understandable right now, during the coronavirus crisis. The number of EI claims is shocking! At last count, there were 2.2 million new EI claims in Canada.)

 However, if you have lost your job and have no other money coming in, you need to apply for Employment Insurance.  So, what are some things that you need to know when you are applying for EI benefits?  Here are 5 things that you need to know:

Applying for EI Benefits: Apply Immediately (Even Without a Record of Employment)

Surprisingly, many do not apply for EI right away, thinking that they need to wait for their record of employment.  They might think that it’s pointless to apply without their ROE.  This is 100% wrong.  You should apply for EI benefits right after you finish your last day of work, period.  Why?  First, you only have 4 weeks from your last work day to apply.  If you do not, you could get less benefits than you are entitled to.

 Second, most records of employment are automatically sent to EI by your employer.  So even if you haven’t received one yet, it’s most likely that the government has it already.

Third, the government can make a temporary record of employment based on your application and set up your EI claim using that.  Once the actual record of employment comes in, your application can be recalculated. 

Applying for EI: More Details are Better

For some reason, many people don’t want to describe the reasons why they are no longer working.  Maybe it’s because they are shy or perhaps, they do not want to seem to complain about their situation.    However, it is extremely important to give full details on why you are no longer working, especially if you quit or were dismissed.  More is better!  Think about it this way: whoever is going to look at your application has no idea of the situation at all.  For them, it’s like looking at a blank canvas.  You need to create a detailed picture or painting.  The more details you can provide, the clearer the picture is.  This helps the benefits officer make a better decision on your application.

Applying for EI: Dismissal is Not Actually Bad

This is one of the biggest misconceptions about EI.  Most people think if you get dismissed or fired from your job that you automatically won’t get EI.  Employers will even tell employees that it’s better for you to quit than to get fired.  This is absolutely not true!  Why?  Because if your employer dismisses you, the onus is on the employer to prove misconduct on the part of the employee in order to deny their EI benefits.  A lot of EI adjudicators use the Black’s Dictionary of misconduct to define whether someone has done something that is willful and of evil intent. 

For example, if your employer dismissed you because you were not good at your job that is not misconduct.  Even if you were late for work, or were argumentative etc., the employer would have to show that they addressed the issue.  For example, were there warnings, conversations and the like?   Even, for things like accusing an employee of theft, the responsibility is on the employer to show or prove that this happened.  For example, were their witnesses?  Is there video?  Did they call the police and file a police report? 

Also, if an employee was paid severance by their employer, this shows that there wasn’t misconduct The thinking behind this is why would you pay additional money to someone who committed misconduct?  As you can see, with dismissal the pressure is on the employer to prove misconduct, which is not easy to do.

It’s a Lot Harder to Get EI Benefits if You Quit

Many people do not realize this, but it is really hard to get EI benefits if you quit.  Unfortunately, people think that it’s better than getting dismissed or fired.  This is false, because f you quit all the pressure is on you to prove that you had “just cause” in quitting.  What does this mean?  It means that you had no other choice.

For example, suppose you were being harassed at work by a co-worker.  You couldn’t take it anymore and wanted to quit.  However, for EI purposes you would have to exhaust your alternatives first.  Did you talk to a manager about the harassment?  Had you gone to your union about the harassment?  Did you go to Human Resources?  Did you go to Labour Standards or Human Rights?  If you did and there was still no real change in your situation then you would have a chance to get EI benefits. 

A tool that can help you if you are in this position of either thinking of quitting your job or you’ve already done so is the EI Digest.   This document lays out how different EI issues are looked at. It can give you some insight on what information you would need to provide on your EI application.

If Rejected, Appeal

It is always tough to get a rejection letter, but especially when it comes to EI benefits.  As a result, many people give up and move on.  However, in a lot of cases you should appeal the decision.  You might feel intimidated because when you appeal, it says there will be an appeal hearing with a 3-person tribunal (called a board of referees). You have the option to be present for it.  It is like going to court and who wants to go to court?  However, there is a step that’s not mentioned that might help you if you write an appeal letter on why you feel the decision made was incorrect.

Before an appeal goes to the board of referees, it goes to the appeal department.  This department is made of experienced adjudicators who will look at the application again. They see if the original decision made was correct. And they also decide if they could possibly allow the claim based on information the client has provided on the application and any new information in their appeal letter.

 The advantage of this is that you have a more experienced adjudicator looking at your EI claim with even more information.  This gives you a better chance at being approved.  Also, sometimes they might find another way for you to qualify for EI benefits. For example the information you provided might qualify you for sickness benefits, rather than regular Employment Insurance.  So, it doesn’t hurt to try to appeal a decision if you are rejected.

Conclusion

Applying for EI benefits is hard and can be emotionally draining.  However, if you keep the above points in mind, hopefully the process will be a bit easier   Applying for any government benefit seems intimidating but the more you know about a program, the easier it is to navigate through it.  Hopefully, this results in a favourable outcome for you.

Canada Budget 2021 Highlights

A picture of Canadian 50 dollar bill to denote Canada Budget 2021 highlights.

A few days ago, the Minister of Finance gave Canada budget 2021 highlights. She indicated that there would be 101.4 billion dollars in new spending over next three years. The goal is to recover from the pandemic and kickstart the move to a greener economy. So what are some of the main highlights of the budget?

Canada Budget 2021 Highlights – Main Points

Here are some of the main highlights of the 2021 budget taken from the government of Canada’s website and CBC’s website below. Both those sites go into great deal about the budget but here are the main highlights below:

-Extending the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy, the Canada Emergency Rent Subsidy and Lockdown Support until September 25, 2021.

-Extending the weeks available for the Canada Recovery Benefit and the Canada Recovery Caregiving Benefit.

-Increasing the Employment Insurance sickness benefits from 15 to 26 weeks.

-$30 billion over five years and $8.3 billion per year after that to create and sustain a national child care program. Goal is a $10/day child care service by 2025-2026.

-Taxable grant payment of $500 to Old Age Security pensioners age 75 or older as of June 2022 and a 10 per cent boost to maximum OAS benefits for pensioners 75 or older starting July 1, 2022.

-$18 billion to build safer, healthier Indigenous communities.

-$17.6 billion for green recovery which means to conserve 25 per cent of lands and oceans by 2025. Also, put Canada on course to exceed climate change targets by cutting emissions to 36 per cent below 2005 levels by 2030.

-A new $15 federal minimum wage.

Conclusion

The above are some of the main highlights of the budget. The government’s plan is ambitious but opponents are worried about the excess spending and huge debt that will be incurred. Will the government’s plan work? Only time will tell as life is pretty unpredictable right now.

When is the Deadline for Filing for 2020 Tax Year?

A calculator to use to help you know when to file for 2020 tax year.

When is the deadline for filing taxes this year for 2020? It is a good question because with the pandemic still ranging on, many Canadians are not sure. Last year, the deadline was extended but what about this year? Here are some dates that you need to know.

When is the Deadline for Filing for 2020 Tax Year? Individuals

If you go to the government of Canada’s website, the deadline for individuals this year is April 30, 2021. Also, if you are going to owe any amount in taxes for the year 2020, the due date for payment is also April 30, 2021. If you do not pay any amounts owing by this date, you could incur a late filing fee and interest on the amount owing.

Deadline For Self Employed Individuals and their Cohabiting Spouse or Common Law Partner

The government of Canada website indicated that the deadline for self employed individuals, spouses, or common law partners is June 15, 2021. However, the deadline for any amount owing in taxes for these ones is April 30, 2021. If taxes owing are not paid by then, you could incur a late filing fee and interest on amount owing.

Deadline to File a Deceased Person’s Return

The government of Canada’s website says that if a person died between January 1, 2020 and October 31, 2020, the deadline to file the deceased person’s return is April 30, 2021. And the deadline to pay any tax owing on the deceased person’s return is also April 30, 2021.

If the person died after October 31, 2020 and before May 1, 2021, then the deadline to file the deceased person’s return is six months after date of individual’s death. The deadline for taxes owing on deceased person’s return is also six months after individual’s death. However, the surviving cohabitating spouse or common law would still have to pay any tax owing on their returns by April 30, 2021.

Deadline for Corporations

The deadline for for corporations is six months after the end of the corporation’s tax year.

When is the Deadline for Filing Taxes for 2020 Tax Year? Conclusion

Tax season is upon us but it looks like dates of filing are back to the status quo. However, it is good to know that because many might think differently due to the pandemic. But it is always good to check because no one wants to pay any extra interest or late filing fees. Stay safe out there.

CERS and CEWS Extended to June 2021

Picture of Canadian money to denote businesses receiving help due to CERS and CEWS being extended to June 2021.

On March 3, 2021, the government announced that the CERS and CEWS would be extended to June 5, 2021. They said both programs will be maintained at current levels. This is good news for businesses who are still struggling. Here’s what that means below.

CERS and CEWS Extended June 2021 Details

The Canada Emergency Rent Subsidy (CERS) will be extended to June 5, 2021. It will still cover up to 65% of eligible employers’ rent. Also, the additional 25% lockdown subsidy top-up for hard hit businesses restricted by more severe public health guidelines will be extended to June 5, 2021.

The Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS) will also be extended to June 5, 2021. It will still cover up to 75% of employees’ wages for eligible employers.

The government also announced an extension for Furloughed workers to June 5, 2021. Here’s a quote from the government’s website regarding this:

“the government intends to continue to align the wage subsidy rate structure with the benefits provided through the Employment Insurance program from March 14 to June 5, 2021. This means employers who qualify for the wage subsidy would be able to continue to claim up to a maximum benefit of $595 per week per employee to support remuneration of their furloughed workers.”

Conclusion

The Prime Minister said, “This isn’t the time to pull back on support for workers or business owners, it’s the time to see people through what is hopefully the final stretch of this crisis and it’s time to get the whole economy ready to come roaring back,”

Hopefully he is correct and we are in the final stretch of this pandemic. But as already seen so far, the coronavirus is unpredictable and highly resilient. So only time will tell if we are nearing the finish line. Until then, please stay safe.

10 Ways to Save Money on Rent – Saving on Apartments and Condos

There is no greater cost for most of us than our housing costs – either our monthly rent, or mortgage. In some large cities – I’m looking at you Toronto and Vancouver – monthly rental costs can easily swallow up half of our paycheques! (Or, sadly sometimes way more!!) With rent prices skyrocketing, we thought it would be helpful to discuss some ways you can save money on renting an apartment, house or condo. If you can lower your rent costs, then you’ll be able to live within a budget. So, here are our 10 favorite tips!

1. Look for apartments in the ‘off season’

Sometimes you just can’t control when you need to rent a new place. For instance, if you’re a student – well, you need to rent an apartment to be ready for the new school year! But, if you are in a situation when you can be flexible about when you look for your new digs, choose winter time to search. Fewer other people will be searching then, and you might secure a lower lease because of it.

2. Add up all the costs – rent plus utilities

Sure, that gorgeous little downtown condo sounds like an impressive bargain! But, make sure you include all costs in your total rent payment. If the rent is $1500, but then parking is $150 and utilities are $200 your total rent payment is actually $1850! If there’s another condo located in the same building for $1750, with all costs included then you’re better off choosing Condo B. Do your research to discover what your full monthly housing costs will be.

3. Negotiate a lower rent

If you’re a brand new tenant, you may be able to negotiate rent by being knowledgeable about the area and what typical rental costs are. You can even print out similar properties with the rent that is currently being charged. If the landlord is reasonable, they may be willing to lower the rent. Or, if you’re a long-term tenant, use your record of excellent payment and tenancy to negotiate to either stay at the same rent or even lower it. Or, sometimes landlords are willing to negotiate for other freebies such as free additional storage space, or free parking. (I’ve recently done exactly that – received free parking that would’ve otherwise cost $65/month, because we are long-term, excellent tenants.)

4. Offer to do repairs, maintenance or lawn work

Your landlord may really appreciate it if you’re willing to do some of their hard work for them! It never hurts to ask if you could do some repairs around the place for a lowered rent. Or, you could do regular maintenance or yard work – such as raking up leaves, mowing the lawn, or shoveling snow. Ask them if you could negotiate your rent based on offering these maintenance services. Then, if they agree – get your agreement in writing.

5. Manage an apartment building

Some people get free rent by managing an apartment building! Others will receive reduced rent for doing this job. But, make sure you know what you’re signing up for. Other tenants will come to you with complaints, and worries and even possibly to drop off rent cheques. Make sure you want to take on this responsibility before signing up to be a resident manager. If this kind of job sounds ideal, then you may snag some very cheap rent!

Home sweet home

6. Get a Roommate

Sure, getting a roommate may be an obvious choice to reducing your overall rental costs, but make sure to do your research. As in: know the person you’re going to share your home with! Ask around your friends to see if anyone needs a good roommate, or even at your workplace. Set up careful rules about how rent will be paid, how utilities will be divided, and even how food will be shared.

7. Sign a longer lease

Have you found your dream place? Are you worried that rent prices are just going to continue going up, up, UP? Well, then sign a longer lease. Ask your landlord or the management company of your building if a longer lease is an option. This could be 1 year, or even 2 years or longer. Then, you’ll have locked in your housing costs for that period of time and won’t have to worry about that dreaded letter being slipped under your door telling you about rent increases.

8. Rental Incentives

Especially in areas where there are a lot of rentals available, and too few qualified renters – there will be rental incentives. Take note of signs in the areas you’re looking to live in of these special offers. $500 off, Free Parking, 1 month free rent, and other offers may be used to entice new tenants to sign a lease at that apartment or condo complex. And, if there are incentives, you know too that the landlord may be willing to negotiate a bit more in other areas – such as free cable or internet. It’s always worth asking! (Just be polite about it, and don’t seem as if you’re trying to take advantage.)

9. Refer a Friend

Often, larger condos or apartment buildings may have a referral system in place to reward you if a friend moves in. At one point, where we live, both we and our friend received $150 off rent, and all because we referred her! It’s worth checking it out, and seeing if there are any perks for referring people to live in the same complex you do. And hey, then you’ll know the neighbors, too!

10. Rent an unfurnished apartment

If this is the first time out on your own, you may be very tempted by gorgeous, glossy looking, fully furnished apartments or condos. But, the price for these can be outrageously high! Instead, choose a small first apartment and then furnish it very cheaply. You can do so by letting your family and friends know (it seems like everyone’s Auntie or Grandma has some extra, old furniture lying around unused in the attic) or also by finding freebies or very inexpensive furniture on Craigslist or Kijiji. It’ll take a little time to furnish your place, but this way you’ll also make it more your own, unique space.

Canada Mortgage Rates as of January 11, 2021

A picture of a toy house with keys to denote Canadians wanting to know Canada mortgage rates.

What are the Canada mortgage rates currently? Many want to know because many people find themselves reevaluating their living arrangements due to COVID-19. As a result, more and more Canadians are looking to purchase a house where they can have more space and more land so they can feel safer. It is a new right now. So what are the Canada mortgage rates right now?

Canada Mortgage Rates Currently at 3 of the Big Banks

Scotiabank

Variable Rate Mortgages

Posted Rate
Scotia Ultimate Variable Rate Mortgage-Closed 3 Year Term3.350%1
Scotia Flex Value Mortgage-Closed 5 Year Term2.650%2
Scotia Flex Value Mortgage-Open 5 Year Term5.750%3

Closed Term Fixed Rate Mortgages

TermRate
1 year3.090%
2 years3.190%
3 years3.790%
4 years4.090%
5 years4.790%
7 years5.390%
10 years5.890%

Short Term Fixed Rate Mortgages

TermRate
Open Mortgage – 6 month5.750%
Open Mortgage – 1 year5.750%
Flexible/Closed Mortgage – 6 month4.250%

Royal Bank

Popular Rates

TermSpecial OffersAPR
2 Year Fixed2.090%2.150%
5 Year Fixed2.170%2.200%
5 Year VariableRBC Prime Rate – 0.550% (1.900%)1.930%

TD Bank

TD Special Mortgage Rates

TermSpecial Rate3APR    4,   5
3 Year Fixed Closed72.14%2.18%
5 Year Fixed Closed71.94%1.96%
5 Year Fixed Closed
High-Ratio9
1.84%1.86%
5 Year Variable Closed61.70%1.72%

TD Mortgage Prime Rate is 2.60%

Conclusion

The rates above are just a sample of the rates currently available today. However, rates can change, so it is good to either look at a bank’s website or contact them directly for latest rates.

Home ownership in Canada is high when compared with other countries and this trend will continue. (Approximately 66% of Canadians own a property.) And despite (or perhaps even because of) Coronavirus, Canadians are still looking for homes. As a result, mortgage rate shopping has become more important. Please stay safe.

Government of Canada’s Fall Economic Statement and Budget – Highlights

A picture of someone holding Canadian money to denote how the Government of Canada's fall economic statement will affects many Canadian's pocket books.

On Monday November 30, 2020, I got up and watched the Government of Canada’s fall economic statement. I wanted to see what further relief plans they had for Canadians who are struggling due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The finance minister, Chyrstia Freeland, mentioned a myriad of things they were planning to do with some ideas being more concrete than others. Here are some of the highlights below.

Government of Canada’s Fall Economic Statement- Increasing the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS) Rate

To continue to help businesses, the government is increasing the maximum rate of the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy to 75 per cent for the period beginning December 20, 2020 and extending this rate until March 13, 2021. This means the government will cover up to 75% of employees’ wages during this time period. Originally, this had decreased, but this amount has now been restored to cover up to 75% of wages again.

Extension of The Canada Emergency Rent Subsidy (CERS) Rate and Lockdown Support

The current maximum rate of the Canada Emergency Rent Subsidy is 65 percent and businesses severely affected by a lockdown good get could get up to additional 25 percent of eligible expenses. This rate was to last until December 19, 2020 but now has been extended until March 13, 2021.

Potential Support for Airlines, Tourism, Hotels, Arts – Highly Affected Sectors Credit

The Finance Minister also mentioned setting up low interest loans in these industries of up to a million dollars. Those industries, as noted in the heading, are airlines, tourism, hotels and the arts. The terms of these loans would be extended over a period of up to 10 years. This will be called the Highly Affected Sectors Credit Availability Program.

Government of Canada’s Fall Economic Statement – More Support for Families

To help families with young children through the pandemic, the government will provide temporary support of up to $1,200 in 2021 for each child under the age of six for families entitled to the Canada Child Benefit.

Conclusion

The Government of Canada’s Fall Economic statement contained a lot of details on programs and ideas to help Canadians navigate through this pandemic and beyond. The above were just some of the main highlights gleaned from it. If you want a more detailed listing, please visit the government’s website. The cost of these programs will be enormous but the government feels it is necessary for the situation we are in. Will it help? Only time will tell but for many who are suffering due to covid-19, any help at all is good help. Stay safe.